The After Interview Follow-up

There are a few “to-do’s” on your list when you complete an interview. It’s good to take detailed notes right after; this keeps the conversation top of mind, you can think of ways that you are a good fit for the job and any possible objections they may have. While you are taking notes, it’s good to think from the employer’s perspective; how do they see you fitting into their staff, what concerns may they have, how could you contribute.

The last and most important thing to do after your interview is to follow up. There are three ways that people typically follow-up:

Written:
Your first follow-up should be written, send by through the mail if time allows. In addition to expressing your thanks, the letter gives you a chance to emphasize the strong points you made during the interview and add to the answers you may have been a little weak. If possible, refer to something the interviewer said or something you saw that was particularly interesting. Be sure to express, again, your interest in the job.

By Telephone:
Follow-up by telephone is one of the most important activities in the job search. Following up is also the activity most assiduously avoided by job seekers because of the fear of rejection. However, initiative and proactive behavior are important qualities companies seek in new employees, and following up is a demonstration of those qualities.

Set a target for yourself of five to seven working days, at which time you will make your follow-up call. When making the call, you are not necessarily seeking a final decision; rather, your call is an ongoing expression of interest, a demonstration of your willingness to initiate and one more chance to keep your name in front of the decision-makers.

Via email:
Email is acceptable for thank-you letters, particularly when timing is critical. You can take the same pointers in the “written” follow-up above.